Brigadeiro – A Brazilian Dessert/Un postre brasileño

-traducción en español al fin de esta entrada-

Well, well, well.  Has it been too long since I’ve put up a new entry?  Unfortunately it has!  I am looking at the date that my last entry was posted and I am ashamed of myself for letting this blog go so long without any kind of maintenance.  The good news is that though I haven’t beent he best blogger there have been nearly 60 people everyday who still visit The Handicapped Kitchen.  So, thanks goes out to all you who have been visiting!  Truth be told, the last months of my work in Peru were absolutely so jam-packed it was ridiculous to even think about mustering up something in the kitchen and then set up studio to take pictures.

To update you on where I am at, I have recently moved from Puno, Peru to Quito, Ecuador and am now living at only about 9,000 feet above sea level!  It doesn’t matter much, the air is still thin and anything beyond a brisk walk turns into my lungs becoming coughed out onto the sidewalk.  But, Ecuador is a beautiful country, so that makes up for it!

As for the dessert, I wanted to share with you all this very popular Brasilian dessert.  It is called brigadeiro (pronouned bree-gah-day-roo).  They are little balls of chocolate that taste something like tootsie rolls, but much more delicious.  And they are simply easy to make!

You need these three ingredients!  That is it. They are

  • 1 can sweetened condensed milk
  • 3 tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1 tbsp butter or margerine

Put all the ingredients in a medium sauce pan and mix together.  Put over medium heat and stir constantly.  Yea, there is a reason that is bold and italicized.  It is very important.  You are working with milk here, and if you burn it… yuck!

I made a video for this post specifically because it is hard to explain the consistency this dessert should have when the dough is ready to be taken off the heat.  The video is at the bottom of this post.

You will cook this dough over medium heat and stir constantly for about 10 minutes.  It will begin to boil within the first few minutes and will thicken gradually.

You will see in the video that you want to take the dough off the heat when the dough seems to sit in the middle of the bottom of the pan in a mass and seems to pull away from the sides of the pan.  It will seem like a big blob.

Remove the pan from the heat and with a spatula scrap it out into another heat-proof bowl and let it cool.  I let mine cool for a little over an hour.

Then, grease your hands with butter or something of the kind -especially your fingertips- and pul out the dough a piece at a time and roll into balls.  Place them on a tray.  At this point, if you decide to, you can roll them in crushed nuts or powdered sugar or cocoa powder.  They really make for cute little desserts.  When they are all rolled into little balls put them in the fridge over night.  Serve chilled.

ESPAÑOL:

Bueeeeeno, ¿hace mucho tiempo que no escribo una nueva entrada?  Desafortunadamente, la respuesta es un gran ¡SÍ!  Estoy mirando la fecha de la entrada anterior y me da vergüenza por dejar a este blog tanto tiempo sin ningún tipo de mantenimiento.  La buena nueva es que aunque yo no he sido lo mejor de los blogueros hay muchos de ustedes que cada día están visitando a The Handicapped Kitchen a pesar de mi negligencia.  Diario tengo casi 60 visitas.  Entonces, toda mi gratitud les mando a ustedes que son más fieles que yo.  Para decir la verdad, los últimos meses de mi trabajo en Perú eran absolutamente demasiado atiborrados de eventos y la preparación para salir y fue agotador para pensar aún en la posibilidad de pasar un día en la cocina ni que hablar de sacar fotos de la comida.

Para ponerles al corriente de mi vida y donde estoy, recién me he mudado desde Puno, Perú a Quito, Ecuador y ahora vivo a ¡2,800 metros sobre el nivel del mar!  No importa tanto, pues, porque el aire sigue siendo menos rico de oxígeno y algo más que dar pasos ligeros hace que mis pulmones quieran voltearse de mi cuerpo al suelo.  Pero, Ecuador es un país hermoso, ¡así que lo compensa!

En cuanto al postre, o quiero compartir con ustedes este postre brasileño muy popular.  Se llama brigadeiro.  Son bolitas de chocolate que se asemejan a un dulce americano Tootsie Rolls, pero mucho más delicioso.  Y, que más que ¡son fáciles hacer!

Los ingredients que necesitarás son tres.  ¡Eso es!  Son:

  • 1 lata de leche condensada
  • 3 cucharadas de cocoa puro
  • 1 cucharada de mantequilla o margarina

Pon todos los ingredientes en una olla de tamaño medio y mezcla.  Ponlo sobre medio fuego y revuelva constantemente.  Sí, pues, hay una razòn porque he puesto esa palabra en letra negra y cursiva.  Es muy importante.  Estás tratando con leche, pues, y si lo quemes… ¡qué asco!

Hice un video para esta entrada específicamente porque es difícil explicar como debe parecer la consistencia de este postre cuando está listo remover del fuego.  El video está aquí al fondo de esta entrada.

Lo cocinarás sobre medio fuego y lo revolverás continuamente por uno 10 minutos.  Empezará hervir entres los primeros minutos -no desvies la mirada ni dejes de revolverlo- se va a hacer más espeso gráduamente.  Ve el video -que también está en español- para ver la consistencia.

The Videos/Los Videos

Borrachitos – Rum Balls

“Buen dia” to everyone.  My day has come to an end and to celebrate that fact I am in bed with apple slices, caramel sauce and two borrachitos.  It’s a good end to these past two days.  Have you ever had several days that feel like one big long day?  Those are my Wednesdays and Thursdays.  So, coming home and finding these little chocolate delicacies still in the fridge is quite the lucky surprise.  Living with 8 other ravenous fridge mongers things like these disappear QUICKLY!

They are, in English, “Little Drunkards.”  But, were profoundly popular in the 60s as Rum Balls.  From the blatantly obvious name of the chocolate truffles, it’s clear that they have rum in them.  Of course, there are always options to replace alcohol, you can replace the rum with apple or orange juice.

When I searched for these online, I had the hardest time finding them!  I had first tried these in Arequipa, Peru.  They were in a little bakery hidden in the Plaza de Armas.  It was really an accident that we stumbled upon La Canasta one day and when my eyes locked with a big chocolate ball sitting in the display case I knew I just had to try it.  Yum, yum, yum.  It was food love.  I’m beyond happy that what I made in my kitchen turned out to be exactly what I had from La Canasta that blessed day.

I’m pretty sure these will quickly find their way into stomachs among your household members.  They are rather quick to conjure up as well.  Conjure, sounds witchy, that’s as much Halloween theme you’re going to get out of me here.  But, in all seriousness, which should always be our attitudes in the kitchen…………… yea, these are simply simple and can even be considered a no-baking confection!

Anything that is no-bake, to me, is kind of a cheat.  Sorry to all of you who vie for the other side.  So, I baked a cake, which turned out to be the BEST cake I’ve ever made, let alone at 12,000 feet, and posted an article on it.  It’s The Perfect High Altitude Cake.  It raised up to pretty and looked so nice… it was a shame though because I had to mash it all up into crumbs.

Borrachitos
recipe adapted from The Joy of Baking. 

2-3 cups mashed chocolate cake
1 cup confectioners sugar
1/2 cup rum, apple juice or orange juice
4 tbsp corn syrup or honey

Toppings
melted chocolate
confectioners sugar
cocoa powder
sprinkles
finely chopped nuts

If you click on the link above for The Joy of Baking it will take you to the Rum Ball recipe.  My adapted version is a little different.  There’s also a nice video you can watch.

Basically, my version is cheaper.  Nuts are not inexpensive.  So, I used cake instead of vanilla wafers and nuts like TJOB has listed and I also doubled the recipe because I made a 9×13 cake and had a lot of it to use.

So, mash up your cake into fine crumbs.  I just used my hands.  It’s fun to get dirty in the kitchen.  Then, mix in the confectioners sugar.  At this point you may want to get a wooden spoon, because honey or corn syrup won’t be fun to clean off your hands.  Mix in the corn syrup or honey and then the rum or whatever liquid substitute you decide to use.  Mix well.  If your “dough” turns out looking shiny, then mash in some more cake.  You should have a dough that has a satin look.

Before rolling them you may want to put them in the fridge for about 30 minutes.  They might be too sticky to handle, but I honestly didn’t have an issue with this.  Roll into little balls.  You can make them as big as you want, really.  I made them about 2 inches.

Melt your chocolate, or get your stuff to roll them in ready and make ’em pretty!  I’d have to say that out of all the topping ideas, the chocolate covered borrachitos turned out to be the most delicious, though some of the others were just so darn pretty.

As for dipping them in chocolate, I just plopped them in the chocolate and covered them completely and then fished them out with a fork and placed them on a cookie sheet with saran-wrap.  Let them set in the fridge.

Store these babies in the fridge.  The flavor does enhance and change with time.  So, you may want to make them a few days in advance before you bust them out for a party or what-not.  Try not to eat all of them at once, they are quite the temptation.

P.S. The boxes are origami boxes I made from parchment paper.  I’ve got a clever plan to do more things with these little guys.  You can go here to find out how to make them.

P.P.S. You can follow The Handicapped Kitchen on Facebook!  Go to www.facebook.com/thkblog and click the “Like” button to get the latest news on THK in your news feed!

P.P.P.S. I LOVE YOU!

The Perfect Altitude Cake

After many failures.  After much crying and tears shed.  After near moments of sheer rage where I simply wanted to throw caution and my entire kitchen setup to the wind, I have FOUND it.  I have DONE it.  I have made the perfect Altitude Cake.  I have made an adapted chocolate cake for high altitude!

It is chocolaty.  It is delicious.  It is moist!  And it is NOT dense!  I made this cake once before, but it did not turn out as good as it did this time.  This won’t be something for which all of you get to joy and jump around the kitchen screaming praises to God, because all of you are not living at 12,000 ft above sea level, you lucky freaks.

For those of you who have to deal with falling cakes, well you will love me!

Alright, so I can’t take full credit for this cake recipe.  It is a tweaked recipe.  The original I found on All Recipes.  If you have never been to said site, you are missing out and need to head over there as soon as you are done reading this!   Dark Chocolate Cake is the name of the recipe that I found and tweaked.  If you live where altitude is no problem, then you can just click that link and make according to that recipe.  NOTE: I would highly suggest using the comments as a guide.  More often than not, you will find adjustments there that make all the difference.  

Here are my adjustments with notes provided with each ingredient as needed.

Dark Chocolate Perfect Altitude Cake

  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour PLUS 2 tbsp
    Note: Don’t measure the flour exactly.  The goal is to measure out more than needed.  Spoon the flour out into the cup and instead of scrapping off the excess flour that piles on top of the measuring cup, just pour it in.  Then, add two tbsp more of flour.  This gives the mixture more structure.  
  • 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
    Note: When you are baking at high altitude, leavening products become a huge challenge.  The idea is for each tsp of leavening called for reduce to a 1/4 tsp.  So, 2 tsp was the original amount so we reduce it to 1/2 tsp.
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
    Note: Again, more leavening.  Since there was so much, I cut this in half from the original amount which was 1/2 tsp.  
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup butter, melted
    Note: Usually you would cream the butter and sugar together.  Instead, you are going to melt the butter and mix the sugar with it.  I’ll explain that later.    
  • 2 1/4 cups white sugar MINUS 1-2 tbsp
    Note: Baking at high altitude, sugar also affects the outcome of a product.  It’s necessary to take out a certain quantity of sugar.  I left out about 1-2 tbsp of sugar.  
  • 5-6 eggs
    Note:  The original recipe called for 4 eggs.  You will want to add more, this also contributes to the amount of liquid in the mixture and the out-coming structure.  The eggs we get in Peru are various in size, some are extremely small, so I used 6 eggs in my mixture.  If you have all pretty well sized eggs just use 5.     
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
How It’s Done
Note:
explanations and more in-depth directions are all in italics.
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).  When baking at higher altitude, it’s necessary to increase the temperature of the oven.  It’s usually the basic rule of thumb to increase the temperature by 25 degrees.  You need the liquid in the batter to evaporate quicker so the overall structure will set before it can rise too much and then break and fall.  

Grease 3 – 9 inch round cake pans or one 9×13″ pan.  In a medium bowl, pour the boiling water over the cocoa, and whisk until smooth. Set aside and let cool.
In another bowl sift together flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt; set aside.

Basic note for baking at high altitude.  Mixing and beating the batter by hand will give you more control over how much air is incorporated into the mixture.  I will explain as we go along why the amount of air in a batter is so important.  

All seems nice and normal until this point.  Here I did something that I thought was going to ruin my cake.  I melted my butter over low heat on the stove and added the sugar to this, whisking until well incorporated.  Now, the first reason I did this was because the Handicap Kitchen mixer caught on fire and is out of commission.
 The second reason is my theory for why this is necessary.  When you cream your sugar and butter together you are essentially creating pockets of air in your fatty product (butter).  Butter is not the only thing that does this in a cake batter, eggs also do this.  But, while a cake is baking at high altitude it’s important to not have TOO many air bubbles.  The leavening products react with the air pockets and cause them to grow.  This is their job!  But, at high altitudes this process happens a lot quicker and if there are a lot of air pockets and a lot of leavening product in your cake batter it will break and fall.  You will cry.  So, the challenge is to beat air into the batter in moderation with a reduction of leavening.  Make sense?  So, by melting the butter, I basically removed one more constituent of the danger of getting too many air pockets.  

Once you’ve mixed your sugar and butter together beat in the eggs.  It’s important to not beat the eggs in all at once.  However, you do want to be careful of beating the mixture too much.  I beat in two eggs at a time twice and then the rest of the times one egg at a time.  Does that make sense?  If you beat the eggs too much you will have to problem of too many air pockets.  You need to beat in the eggs just until they are mixed into the batter.  This should be approximately beating ten times for each (or pair) of eggs.  

Then stir in vanilla.

Add the flour mixture alternately with the cocoa mixture.  It’s important at this point that you stir instead of beat.  If you beat you may add too many air pockets.  Work carefully, folding the flour into the batter and mixing in the cocoa mixture.  

Spread batter evenly between the 3 prepared pans or into the 9×13″ pan.
Bake in preheated oven for 25 to 30 minutes. Allow to cool.  I find that at high altitudes it takes a bit longer to bake cakes all the way through.  You may need more like 30-45 minutes.  

Please, if you have any questions, leave a comment and ask, or send an email to thehandicappedkitchen at gmail dot com.

Have you ever baked at high altitude?  What were your experiences?
Also, find me on Facebook and like the page to get updates about what I’m making and when!  Find me here.

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Cake

There are plenty of things in life that are easy.  Those that are easier for some than others.  I find it easy to talk to strangers, learn languages, laugh, knit, cook and maybe some other domestic things.

But, there are also those things in life that are hard.  What may be easier for you may be harder for me and vice-versa.  I, for example, have a hard time with taxes, keeping my money in my pocket, not biting my cuticles (which I was just doing…) and saying good-bye.

Good-byes suck.  I hardly find it easy to say good-bye if I don’t know when I’ll see the person next.  And then there’s the awkward… do I hug, shake hands, kiss?!  And then you end up doing all three and you walk away thinking… what a great last impression.

Well, I’m pretty sure that a guarantee cure for good-bye sadness is a block of chocolate chip cookie dough!  So, that’s why for my friend’s going away party I made Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Cake.  Have you never heard of it before?  Neither had I.  I made it up.

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I’m pretty sure this cake could cure anyone’s blues.  In particular, I have two good-byes coming up.  One, if my friend Micah who is leaving Puno to go live with his parents in Arequipa.  So, it will only be a 6 hour drive to see him, but it still is sad.  The other, is my dog Roxy.  She is 14 this year, I think, and she has just been diagnosed with congestive heart failure… my parents are giving her medicine hopefully so that she’ll hold on until I come home in July.  It will be hard loosing her.  She’s been a good dog.

So, really!  Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Cake?  How could this not help?!  Or even this guy:

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Yea, Rocky… you pee in my house still, but I love you.

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Cake

Cookie Dough via Joy the Baker

2 sticks (1 cup or 8 ounces) unsalted butter at room temperature
2 1/4 cups tablespoons all purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda (i know we’re not baking them, it’s for flavor)
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 cup brown sugar
2/3 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2/3 cup Greek yogurt or applesauce or peanut butter
2 cups semi sweet chocolate chips

I doubled this recipe from Joy’s original.  This is the base, as you can see from the picture above.  Put butter and the sugars in a mixing bowl and cream until fluffy.  Should take around three minutes with a machine.  Then, beat in your applesauce/yogurt/peanut butter along with the vanilla.

In a separate bowl whisk together the flour, baking soda and salt.  Once whisked together well, add to the butter mixture all at once and mix until well incorporated.  Then, fold in the chocolate chips.

Grease and flour a 9×13 pan and then spread the chocolate chip cookie dough into the bottom.  My dough turned out rather soft, but I also didn’t use real butter.  So, if you feel your dough is also on the runny side, put it in the freezer, if your dough is fine just put it in the fridge until your ready for the next step

Chocolate Mousse Layer
via Alton Brown

1 3/4 cups whipping cream
12 ounces quality semi-sweet chocolate chips
3 ounces espresso or strong coffee
1 tablespoon dark rum (if you do not want to use rum you can just leave it out)
4 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon flavorless, granulated gelatin

Chill 1 1/2 cups whipping cream in refrigerator. Chill metal mixing bowl and mixer beaters in freezer.

In top of a double boiler, combine chocolate chips, coffee, rum and butter. Melt over barely simmering water, stirring constantly. Remove from heat while a couple of chunks are still visible. Cool, stirring occasionally to just above body temperature.

Pour remaining 1/4 cup whipping cream into a metal measuring cup and sprinkle in the gelatin. Allow gelatin to “bloom” for 10 minutes. Then carefully heat by swirling the measuring cup over a low gas flame or candle. Do not boil or gelatin will be damaged. Stir mixture into the cooled chocolate and set aside.

In the chilled mixing bowl, beat cream to medium peaks. Stir 1/4 of the whipped cream into the chocolate mixture to lighten it. Fold in the remaining whipped cream in two doses. There may be streaks of whipped cream in the chocolate and that is fine. Do not over work the mousse.

Put it all together

Take the chocolate chip layer out of the fridge or freezer or wherever you put it and pour the mousse over and spread evenly into all the corners.  Then, you can make your own whipped cream, or you can use Cool-Whip.  I had to use Chantilly that comes in a powder form and I beat that with milk.  That’s also what I had to replace the heavy whipping cream with that you put in the mousse as well.  Oh my kitchen…

But, voila!  Mira!  Look at this piece of heaven.  I’m so happy my food creation worked.  Whew.

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What do you eat when you are down and out?  Do you fetch a bowl of ice cream?  Or even the whole pint?  Or do you dive into your jar of pickles… hmm for me that ties with the cookie dough!

Dulce de Leche Brownies

Today was kind of a bummer day.  It’s just one thing that can put the bushel over your candle and snuff out what bit of positive light was left fizzling on the wick.  It wasn’t particularly a productive day, other than the house got really clean and the fridge thawed… which I hope is never as hard to do again as it was today.

We were supposed to meet with Leonor, this woman we met months ago.  It has been a long time since we’ve been able to sit down with her and do a Bible study, and that time has been extended even more.  She wasn’t home.

I’m glad that I had my friend Kristen there with me, yet I felt bad.  I drug Franci and Kristen out there with me so Leonor could meet some of the girls on our team, and it was a fluke.  So, we prayed and came back home.

It’s funny the things that can bring us back from a sour mood.  This is why I was glad Kristen came along tonight.  She was talking about how much she falls down, this amused me.  So, when I got home I ran to the computer with a grilled cheese sandwich and invited Kristen to join me in watching some America’s Funniest Home Videos on YouTube… specifically people falling.

I love watching people fall down!  Am I a masochist?  No… well, maybe.  There’s just something about watching people bodies flopping about.  I think that’s the concept that really makes me laugh… flopping.  If they had really been hurt I don’t think they would have sent their videos in to be laughed at… right?

So, now I’m listening to John Mayer… oh heavenly voices of heaven.  And I have this guy in my lap:

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Oh, Rocky.  You have helped soothe my soul.

And then, the reason you’re here of course, I made these last night:

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and I had a piece when I got home… I think this really topped it off.  In fact, I took just a few bites from the piece and hid the rest in my armoire because Micah’s in the living room and I’d have to share if he saw me here gnawing on heaven.  I’m just not ready for that.

Rocky just snotted on my wrist… yuck.  But, I’m sure it was loving snot… I’ll take that.

You have two questions to answer; What’s your favorite John Mayer song?  Mine is Stop this Train.  If you don’t have one… I am ashamed.  The other, what is your pet’s name and, well, what is it?!

Dolce de Leche Brownies
as adapted from David Lebovitz (my new muse)

Brownie Mix
1/2 cup salted or unsalted butter, cut into pieces
6 ounces (170g) bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped
1/4 cup  unsweetened Dutch-process cocoa powder
3 large eggs
1 cup sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup flour
optional: 1 cup toasted pecans or walnuts, coarsely chopped (yuck)

Dulce de Leche
1 can condensed milk…
1 pinch salt
(yea that’s it!)

DSC_0374
The best thing about these brownies is that there is no leavening product to be seen in the ingredients.  This makes these brownies the perfect candidate for anyone living at high altitudes.  The only thing you have to worry about is not over-whipping your eggs!

You’ll first want to work on the dulce de leche.  I found this nifty way of making it, Make Dulce de Leche but since our boiling point is at a lower heat it was not working as it should.  Plus, the man in the video knows nothing about Spanish… don’t pay him any attention.  Six hours later I decided to do it my way.

Much like brigadeiro (a brazilian chocolate truffle, which I should do a segment on soon) you cook down the condensed milk in a pan over low heat, with continuous movement.  So, I just dumped the condensed milk in a pan with a pinch of salt and over low heat let it simmer while stirring non-stop.  The milk turned into a beautiful bronze dolce de leche in 15 minutes.  You can do it which ever way you decided.  Set to the side.

Grease an 8×8 pan and dust with flour and preheat the oven for 350 degrees F.  Set the pan to the side.

Then, melt the butter in a medium cooking pot over low heat.  Then, break the chocolate into pieces (or chop it into pieces) and stir constantly.  Once all the chocolate is melted remove the pan from the heat and whisk in the cocoa powder until smooth.  Add in the eggs one at a time (if you’re at high altitude add 1 more tablespoon egg… so the white, if you’re in Puno at 12,000 ft add the whole egg).  Then, stir in the sugar, vanilla and flour (I always add 2 or 3 tbsps of flour at high altitude, it gives the cake mixture more structure and strength while it bakes).  Mix in the nuts if you’re going to ruin your brownies.

Pour half the batter into your pre-greased pan, spreading it evenly over the surface.  Then, plop, drip, drizzle, spread, whichever method you want to employ, just get half of the dulce de leche in there.  Use a knife or something to swirl it around so everyone gets an even bite of it.  Otherwise, your kids are going to be freaking out about who gets the piece with more dulce.  I’m just thinking of you!  Then, pour the rest of the batter over and spread evenly.  Then repeat above dolce de leche application.

Bake in preheated oven for 35-45 minutes.  Now, bake it until it’s firm in the middle.  Meaning, you can poke a toothpick in the center and it can come out still a tad goopy.  If you press the center of the brownie and it’s rather firm to the touch, it’s done.  Take it out and let cool.  Baking it like this will give you that nice gooey center everyone loves brownies for.  If you want to bake it more… I guess that’s your prerogative, but I’m going to label you as strange, and I hate labels so don’t make me do that.

Chocolate Dipped Banana Cake Balls (C.D.B.C.B.)

When you fall your supposed to pull yourself up and try again, right?  And the advice goes that even if you fall again you pull yourself up again.  One, I don’t like failing.  Two, if I fail I hate repeating something I feel should’ve worked the first time.  Baking at high altitudes is a great exercise for me in this department. 

A week ago I tried making Carrot Cake Rolls.  M-mmm.  It sounds good, right?  My inspiration was the classic Pumpkin Roll.  So, I found a Carrot Cake recipe and a Pumpkin Roll recipe and combined the two.  What happened?  I got a cookie sheet full of goop that didn’t set until an hour of baking (it should have only been 15 minutes). 

“What did you want to do, Trevor?” you ask.  I wanted to take the cookie sheet and chuck it out the front door hoping to catch a passing taxi in my baking-gone-wrong rage and bust out his window.  But, instead I slopped on the cream cheese frosting (which at this point I was feeling was a waste of good cream cheese) and rolled it up.  Later, everyone told me it wasn’t very pretty but it was the best thing I had made so far.  Can you imagine how upset I was?  Argh!

So, I decided to try it again, except this time instead of using carrot I would do a banana variation.  Mashed banana is similar to pumpkin puree, so I thought it might turn out better… nope.  It was practically identical the result.  This time I even adjusted the amount of flour, sugar, and leavening crap.  It got me nowhere.  So, looking at my kitchen towel with my sad excuse of a Banana Cake Roll with cream cheese oozing out everywhere, instead of getting upset and wishing doom on the 12,000 foot high city of Puno and all it’s residents, I threw it all in a bowl and mashed it together.  This is what it became. 

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I was really happy to have them turn out and actually hand them to somebody feeling proud of what I was giving them.  Cracked and brittle Carrot or Banana Cake Rolls are just not acceptable. 

Banana Ball Base

3/4 cup flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp salt
3 large eggs
1 cup sugar
2/3 cup mashed banana

The Binder

Cream Cheese Frosting
8 oz cream cheese (room temp)
1 cup powdered sugar
6 tbsp unsalted butter (softened)
1 tsp vanilla extract
———
1/2 cup oatmeal (if needed)

Chocolate … about 175 grams (or 6 oz) of bittersweet chocolate. 

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F and grease a pan… I think you could use a 9×9 pan just fine.  I used a cookie sheet, but that was when I was making a Banana Cake Roll… now you’re making C.D.B.C.B. 

Make the flour mixture by whisking together in a bowl all the dry ingredients except the sugar.  In your mixing bowl mix the eggs and sugar until thick then beat in the mashed banana.  Then stir in the flour mixture.  It’s fine if it’s still lumpy.  Then, pour into the pre-greased pan and put in the over for 15-20 minutes or until when pressed slightly with your finger the cake springs back. 

While baking prepare the cream cheese frosting.  In a mixing bowl blend together the cream cheese and butter until smooth.  Add the vanilla extract and then gradually add the powdered sugar. 

When the cake is cooked turn out, scoop out, or whatever, just get it out of the pan into a bowl and mix it together with the cream cheese frosting and also, at this point, dump in the 1/2 cup oatmeal as a further bonding agent.  If you feel the cake and cream cheese frosting will bind together fine without the oatmeal then leave it out.

Melt the 6 oz of chocolate over simmering water.  Here’s a link that can give you further advice on how to melt your chocolate correctly.  Melting Chocolate.     

Once your chocolate is ready spoon out some of the “dough” you now have and roll it into a ball with your hands.  Stick it on the end of a fork and dip it into the chocolate only covering the bottom part… if you want to cover the whole thing with chocolate you’ll just need more chocolate.  Then place on a baking sheet covered with plastic wrap.  Once you’ve got your pan full place in the freezer for a couple hours and voila!  You’ve got my mistake made delicious.

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